Store bought honey

General Discussion of Diary Posts and Questions on Beekeeping Matters
Post Reply
User avatar
slightmadness
Posts: 1
Joined: October 7th, 2018, 7:49 pm

Store bought honey

Unread post by slightmadness » October 7th, 2018, 7:53 pm

About 4 days ago my bees got into a container of store bought honey. They probably helped themselves to 5-6 ounces of the most generic garbage honey around. I'm worried about the possibility of contracting American Foulbrood. Is there anything I can do proactively now?? Help@@

User avatar
Allen Dick
Site Admin
Posts: 1712
Joined: February 25th, 2003, 10:09 pm
Location: Swalwell, Alberta
Contact:

Re: Store bought honey

Unread post by Allen Dick » October 7th, 2018, 9:04 pm

I don't know where you are or the type of bees you have, but in my experience, it is not all that easy to infect good bees with AFB, especially at some times of year. It takes more than one viable spore to infect a larva and good, hygienic bees will detect and eject infected larvae/pupae before they are a further source of spores.

I would not worry, but it is always wise to insect brood periodically to detect any AFB in the early stages while it is easy to cure. Make sure you know how to hold a frame inverted and look properly into the cells with a strong light at your back -- and what to look for when you do.
Allen Dick, RR#1 Swalwell, Alberta, Canada T0M 1Y0
51° 33'39.64"N 113°18'52.45"W
http://www.honeybeeworld.com/Allen%27s%20Beehives.kmz
Forum owner/janitor
---
Customise your experience at Honeybeeworld Forum at your User control Panel
Change the appearance and layout with your Board Preferences
Please upload your own avatar picture at Edit Avatar. It's easy!
Return to main diary page

User avatar
Countryboy
Forum Regular
Posts: 539
Joined: November 8th, 2010, 9:37 pm
Location: Central Ohio
Contact:

Re: Store bought honey

Unread post by Countryboy » October 9th, 2018, 5:15 am

I sell my honey in stores, and I think it's pretty darn good honey. I've never seen AFB in my hives. The last numbers published by the state that I saw said something like less than 1/10 of one percent of inspected hives had AFB. AFB is a boogeyman in my state.

Educate yourself how to recognize AFB, but don't lose sleep over bees eating some storebought honey.
If you're that worried, spend $5 for postage to mail a comb sample to the Beltsville Bee Lab for a free AFB testing.
B. Farmer Honey
Central Ohio

User avatar
shawnybeegood
Posts: 2
Joined: October 9th, 2018, 7:27 pm
Location: Ontario
Contact:

Re: Store bought honey

Unread post by shawnybeegood » October 9th, 2018, 8:09 pm

slightmadness wrote:
October 7th, 2018, 7:53 pm
About 4 days ago my bees got into a container of store bought honey. They probably helped themselves to 5-6 ounces of the most generic garbage honey around. I'm worried about the possibility of contracting American Foulbrood. Is there anything I can do proactively now?? Help@@
Antibiotics are used as a prophylactic treatment. But I hate the idea of putting antibiotics in the hive. Guess it's a matter of how high a risk you think there is.

Maybe what they got into isn't even honey?
-------
7 hives, 9 years with bees, Toronto, Ontario

http://www.beekeeping.isgood.ca/

User avatar
Allen Dick
Site Admin
Posts: 1712
Joined: February 25th, 2003, 10:09 pm
Location: Swalwell, Alberta
Contact:

Re: Store bought honey

Unread post by Allen Dick » October 10th, 2018, 5:58 am

I think the risk from that particular source is about zero. However the risk from the background is unknowable. Who knows what's within 5 or 6 miles of your bee hives?

That said, the fear of AFB is far overblown in my opinion. I know commercial operators who run thousands of hives over wide areas, including areas where AFB is known to exist, who do not treat prophylactically and have only a few hives that show AFB in any given year. They simply burn them

Is Brian said, don't lose any sleep over this.

If AFB shows up in your hives, it was probably already there, or came from somewhere in the neighborhood.

Learn to recognize it in the early stages and remove it immediately. Requeen. In my experience the bees will not show further AFB.

If you have an AFB breakdown, the stock you're using is probably not very hygienic. That's the reason I recommend to requeen with better stock.

Good stock can handle a little AFB.
Allen Dick, RR#1 Swalwell, Alberta, Canada T0M 1Y0
51° 33'39.64"N 113°18'52.45"W
http://www.honeybeeworld.com/Allen%27s%20Beehives.kmz
Forum owner/janitor
---
Customise your experience at Honeybeeworld Forum at your User control Panel
Change the appearance and layout with your Board Preferences
Please upload your own avatar picture at Edit Avatar. It's easy!
Return to main diary page

User avatar
Countryboy
Forum Regular
Posts: 539
Joined: November 8th, 2010, 9:37 pm
Location: Central Ohio
Contact:

Re: Store bought honey

Unread post by Countryboy » October 11th, 2018, 5:40 pm

Antibiotics are used as a prophylactic treatment.
Not in the US.

As of Jan. 1, 2017, beekeepers can't buy antibiotics without a veterinary prescription or Veterinarian Feed Directive. A veterinarian is required to diagnose the hive with AFB before they will give you a prescription so you can buy antibiotics.

Now if beekeepers purchased terramycin prior to Jan. 1, 2017, they may have stockpiled it, in which case they may be using it prophylactically.
B. Farmer Honey
Central Ohio

Post Reply