Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

General Discussion of Diary Posts and Questions on Beekeeping Matters
Post Reply
User avatar
Abivic0110
Posts: 2
Joined: May 13th, 2017, 2:55 pm

Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

Unread post by Abivic0110 » May 13th, 2017, 3:27 pm

Folks, I live in Bethany, Connecticut and early April installed 2 packages of bees (Italians and Carnolians). Hives are about three feet apart. It has been a pretty cold and wet spring up here. Earlier last week, I noticed less activity in one hive and an increase in dead bees. Decreased activity continued for several days and many of the bees were walking on the ground outside the hive entrance, shaking and walking almost sideways. Just prior to this, the workers were laying comb and I had a good brood pattern with capped and uncapped brood. Our state bee inspector diagnosed the hive as having IAPV and I lost the hive. the other hive seems to be doing OK. I am picking up another package Monday and will install it. I have a ten frame Langstroth hive and about seven frames have drawn comb, brood, pollen, and nectar. The frames are wood with plastic foundation.
Question: What prep do I need to do to the existing hive to ensure the survival of the new package? Thanks all.
Greg

User avatar
Allen Dick
Site Admin
Posts: 1706
Joined: February 25th, 2003, 10:09 pm
Location: Swalwell, Alberta
Contact:

Re: Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

Unread post by Allen Dick » May 13th, 2017, 3:43 pm

I would not do anything special except save any frames that are dirty or have dead brood in them for a second box later when the hive is stronger.

Although viruses have always taken out the odd hive here and there and been a slight to moderate burden on hives, they were seldom lethal to healthy hives.

Occasionally we had epidemics like 'Disappearing Disease' or 'CCD' (none of which ever have been adequately explained) sweep through, killing whole yards, but these days the first suspect is varroa.

Any level of varroa in hives vastly expands the spread of viruses, increases the effects, and injures and weakens the bees, so the first question is always "Do you know your mite levels?"

Packages should be fairly free of varroa, but don't assume. If you detect any varroa the best time to treat is in the cage or immediately after installing while they are broodless.

I discuss how to detect mites by various methods and the meaning of results at various times of year extensively in my diary.
Allen Dick, RR#1 Swalwell, Alberta, Canada T0M 1Y0
51° 33'39.64"N 113°18'52.45"W
http://www.honeybeeworld.com/Allen%27s%20Beehives.kmz
Forum owner/janitor
---
Customise your experience at Honeybeeworld Forum at your User control Panel
Change the appearance and layout with your Board Preferences
Please upload your own avatar picture at Edit Avatar. It's easy!
Return to main diary page

User avatar
Abivic0110
Posts: 2
Joined: May 13th, 2017, 2:55 pm

Re: Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

Unread post by Abivic0110 » May 13th, 2017, 4:14 pm

Thank you so much for your reply. I did not check this package for Varroa mites, because I assumed since it was a newly installed package I would not have an issue until probably the end of June or July. So I am OK just to integrate the new bees into the old hive, minus the dead bees and brood?

User avatar
Allen Dick
Site Admin
Posts: 1706
Joined: February 25th, 2003, 10:09 pm
Location: Swalwell, Alberta
Contact:

Re: Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

Unread post by Allen Dick » May 13th, 2017, 4:16 pm

Yes, you can, but you will have missed the best chance you will ever have to knock the mites down to near zero.

You have a few days to treat before brood is sealed.
Allen Dick, RR#1 Swalwell, Alberta, Canada T0M 1Y0
51° 33'39.64"N 113°18'52.45"W
http://www.honeybeeworld.com/Allen%27s%20Beehives.kmz
Forum owner/janitor
---
Customise your experience at Honeybeeworld Forum at your User control Panel
Change the appearance and layout with your Board Preferences
Please upload your own avatar picture at Edit Avatar. It's easy!
Return to main diary page

Post Reply