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May 2017

 

 

 

 

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Background Image: This box was just put on top of a double yesterday

 

Tuesday May 2nd 2017

Three Hills Forecast: Tonight Mainly cloudy with 30 percent chance of showers early this evening. Clearing this evening. Wind north 20 km/h gusting to 40 becoming light this evening. Low zero.

I've been home a few days now and I am a mess. I'm going nuts. I rushed home from paradise  late Thursday to get my taxes filed and got that done, then ran up to see Jean and family, came home again Saturday and killed a few days tidying and fiddling, then had the Usual Suspects over for supper last night.

It is really hard readjusting to being here.  Coming from living in  a boat on a busy dock in a downtown marina in a warm climate, I'm now in a large home, out in the country with cool weather, and greyer colours. 

Colours at sea level are much richer than here at 3,000 feet because the sunlight there has been filtered and diffused  through an additional 3,000 feet of atmosphere.  Up here, things are bluer and starker.

Most of the atmosphere is within 10 miles of Earth and air is getting thin, even two or three miles up, so 3,000 feet of difference is a lot -- almost 20% of the atmosphere is in that 3,000 feet.

I'm finding I feel depressed and confused after returning and I've been putting myself under pressure, drinking too much and then sleeping twelve hours at night.   I should immediately qualify this, though. It's all relative.  Depressed and confused for me is still pretty happy and active.   I suppose it is natural to come back to 'reality' after enjoying another world.  Here, now that I'm back, I have too many options and too many perceived responsibilities and am letting myself be pulled in too many directions.   I care about too many things.  I know it is silly, but knowing and acting on that knowledge are two different things.

Anything I own owns me and this schoolhouse is getting to me.  I expected the grass would need cutting, but mercifully not.  The bees need attention, and I have only looked at a few hives. As for repairs, etc., that is endless.

I have to just step back and let things drop. This place is just too much. There are so many things needing doing.  I'd like to get rid of this place and move on, but don't know how.  This schoolhouse is not like a house in a city.  I have no idea who would buy me out and the cleanup would be monumental.

Mom called twice in the past weeks wondering when I am going east to see her, so I booked a flight for tomorrow afternoon to be gone a week. 

After returning from Ontario, I was planning on going to Powell River for the Spring Thaw, and I was going to go to the Bluewater meeting in Calgary tonight and  meet a potential crew, but but Spring Thaw timing conflicts with delivering Shongololo from Sidney to Vancouver.  It's a 150 miles of driving to the meeting tonight and back, so everything considered, I  decided to skip the Spring Thaw, cancel tonight's drive and simplify life.

I did get out and look at a few hives yesterday and today and see they are doing well.  I also saw I have red ants and had to deal with that. 

I had left drop boards on over winter, and they are unreadable, but I cleaned them off and replaced them.  A few hours later, I glanced and see a few varroa, so I have to deal with that.  I wonder how many varroa actually fell, too, as the ants are aggressive and were able to walk on the grease and.  They may have hauled a few mites away for dinner.

Someone on the Calgary Beekeepers list had a red ant question and someone said they are no bother.  I had to disagree.

Interestingly, seeing ants on a location tends to indicate it is a superior bee location. They are related species and seem to like the same conditions.

Red ants can destroy a hive. At minimum, they can torment the bees, steal brood and honey, and make the bees angry. With new packages, queens can be lost, possibly killed by their own upset bees. Anything more than a few stray explorer ants on a hive should not be tolerated.

I went out yesterday to check hives and found red ants on two otherwise good hives. I immediately moved the hives a bit and put down some ant poison under them.

I hate to poison ants, but I know how hard they can be to discourage and the damage they can do. At any rate, there are various solutions, some a simple as moving the hive a few feet, putting it on legs, or standing it on a pan of water or oil.

The nuclear solution is to spread ant poison around the hive, making sure that the poison is not likely to touch the bees or be collected by them. Under the hive is a logical spot.

Then someone wondered about open feeding for fear of opening hives and disturbing the bees.

Open feeding in a populated area, especially by inexperienced beekeepers can lead to stinging incidents. This is not guaranteed, but when it happens, it can be chaos.

City beekeepers are advised to keep syrup and honey under cover and inaccessible to robbing.

When feeding inside hives, feeders should be located far enough from hive entrances that the bees can defend them.

Opening hives to fill feeders should not be disruptive if it does not involve shifting frames or moving boxes.

Simply lifting the lid is often ignored by the bees, especially if it is done at a time when the hive is not very active, like early morning.

Contrary to what many think and some advise, a cool, calm time is ideal for a quick glance or feeder filling as the bees will be loosely clustered and dozing. At such times, it is easy to appraise the population and access the feeder without having bees fly up or run all over. If the job takes too long, though, the bees will get more active and can become a problem. A lit smoker at hand is always a good idea, but smoke should only be used if the bees start getting in the way and only tiny, gentle puffs, carefully directed onto problem areas should be needed.

There is really no risk of chilling the bees or doing harm if you are not clumsy and pre-plan your actions, have everything ready and only have the hive open for a few minutes.

Bees have an amazing ability to generate heat and any decent colony can reverse any cooling you cause within minutes, if not seconds.

I have seen hives that had lids blown off in cool rainy weather or even winter go on to survive and thrive after having this discovered and corrected within a few days. As long as the cluster remains intact and food is freely available to it, a colony can withstand a lot more exposure than we may think.

 

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

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A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

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Wednesday May 3rd 2017

Three Hills Forecast: Today Mainly sunny. Wind becoming northwest 20 km/h this afternoon. High 22. UV index 7 or high. Tonight Clear. Wind northwest 20 km/h becoming light this evening. Low plus 4.

I checked the drop boards this morning and saw the same four varroa on one and none on the other, so I guess I have less to worry about than I thought.  I did evaporate oxalic a time or two last fall as I recall.

      

There is some discussion of what daily drop counts mean here and here

It seems that Jean-Pierre Chapleau's pages, a former source of good information, are gone from the web.  Sad, if true.  No, wait, a search comes up with a new address.

Before noon, I drove to YYC, parked, caught the shuttle, and boarded WJ670. A while later, I was at YYZ, and two hours later on a Q400, bound for Sudbury.

Bill picked me up at YSB and drove me to 1207.  By then, it was after midnight and I went straight to bed.

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
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Thursday May 4th 2017

Three Hills Forecast: Today Clearing. Wind becoming west 20 km/h this afternoon. High 28. UV index 7 or high. Tonight Partly cloudy. Becoming clear this evening. Wind west 20 km/h becoming light this evening. Low 7.

I'm in Sudbury, and it is warm here today, but at home we are experiencing a heat wave.  This is the sort of weather that guarantees swarming within three weeks and sets us up for splitting in two.

Why?  On hot days, the hive interior becomes warm enough that the bees can occupy the entire space and wax gets soft enough to work easily.  Honey softens and is easier to move around.  Fewer bees can do more.  The heat brings on spring blooms and nectar and a wider variety of pollen becomes available, further stimulating the bees.  All the forces align for expansion.

With warm days and nights, a larger volume can be reliably kept at brood temperature and the workers expand the brood nest, use up the food around the brood and prepare more cells for the queen.  The queen ventures farther out, laying large areas of new brood. After a long period of cold and scarcity, it is now boom time and the bees shift gears from survival to build-up.

Assuming the colony can feed and keep all that new brood warm enough to pupate, within a week, slabs of sealed brood will be seen, and, three weeks from the warm spell, the first of the new generation of 'Boomer' bees will emerge.  Once the new brood is developing, its metabolic processes add to brood nest warmth, although to a lesser extent than adult bees do, further encouraging expansion.

Days before the new wave of bees emerges, though, the most successful colonies will already be getting crowded and be foreseeing the limitations of their space -- and perhaps detecting limitations in their queen, especially if she has been laying large numbers of eggs for a long time.  They will be preparing to raise new queens and divide and/or replace the reigning queen in anticipation of the arrival of the new generation.

Once that decision is made, it is hard to reverse, although some colonies, less intent on swarming but intent on supercedure, may only raise a few cells and could go either way, depending on conditions when the new queens are emerging.  

At this time, scouts will be seen reconnoitering the neighbourhood, peeking into any opening looking for a new home, and any swarm traps that beekeepers have not set out before now will likely be ignored.  Any old hive boxes left around that have been robbed out may well attract their attention.

The days leading up to the population explosion are the ideal time to split, as splitting now is exactly what the bees were planning anyhow and the bees and the beekeeper are working as one. 

If the beekeeper does not do the splitting and before the swarm date, the bees will, and right on schedule, three weeks after the first real heat wave or as soon as the slower hives are ready/.

Swarming is as natural for bees as having children is for humans.  Preventing swarming is either a matter of assisting nature or going against nature. Swarm prevention involves either going with the urge and making splits that suit us, or by dulling the urge by either 1.) weakening the colonies or 2.) proactively reducing crowding.

Many of the elaborate methods promoted in books and articles are simply ways to confuse and weaken the colonies disguised as management.  Bad idea IMO. 

Others, the valid and sensible plans, are simply ways to give the bees room ahead of their needs and avoid congestion or queen problems, queen problems being the other principle reason colonies may start cells that could incite swarming -- rather than the intended queen replacement -- if the right conditions develop when the new queen(s) emerge.

Mom's car was getting pretty dirty and so I took it downtown for detailing. Bill picked me up and we returned to 1207 to visit with Mom, then Bill and I walked around Minnow Lake. 

On the homestretch, we stopped in at a hotel that I have walked by for 65 years without ever going in, and had a beer. I ordered a small Bud Light and so did Bill.  The glasses were the old standard beer glasses I remember from days gone by and not the monster 17 to 20 oz glasses that are what you get these days.  I was amazed the total tab for two was $2.75, not nearly the the 8.90 I paid for one glass when passing through YYZ last night.

On Google Earth, Minnow Lake is frozen, but at present it is not.  Today was ideal shirtsleeve weather. The path measures two miles.

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
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Friday May 5th 2017

Three Hills Forecast: Today A mix of sun and cloud. Risk of a thunderstorm late this afternoon. Wind becoming south 20 km/h gusting to 40 near noon then southwest 40 gusting to 60. High 30. UV index 7 or high. Tonight Partly cloudy. Risk of a thunderstorm early this evening. Wind southwest 40 km/h gusting to 60 becoming light this evening. Low 10.

I'm in Sudbury, and the predictions are for deteriorating weather, with cloud and some rain.  At home, the heat is on.  Thirty degrees Celsius is expected today.

How to Inspect a Beehive the Easy Way. 

With the excellent cameras available cheaply and now that cellphones come with excellent cameras, inspecting hives and getting expert opinions is much easier than in the past.  A thorough inspection can be just a matter of going through the hive frame by frame, taking pictures as we go, closing the hive, examining the pictures -- and sharing on the Internet.  If any issues are discovered, and if we did the job properly with proper labeling, we know exactly which frames to pull on the next visit.

Doing this job right, so that the shots are useful is not just a matter of taking a few snapshot selfies with frames held out front, though.  You'll want clear shots of entire comb surfaces with a clear, well-lit view into each open cell. The job requires careful planning, a little practice beforehand, and some careful attention to basic photography.

Consider carefully what you will want to see later on a large screen.  You can always erase unneeded and duplicate shots later, but you'll be sorry if you neglected recording something that later seems important or if a bee flew in front of the lens at a critical time.  You won't have time to look critically at each shot when shooting, so shoot extras of each view.

Be sure to shoot at maximum resolution and do practice shots. Learn how to control focus and exposure if the automatic setting results in images that are variable.  That can be the case with some cameras and some cloud conditions, so sometimes locking the settings can ensure more consistent results. Even the simplest camera or phone has focus and exposure settings and although the automatic setting usually works well for me, your mileage may vary.  Experiment until you like what you see every time if you want to avoid a do-over.

Besides shooting both sides of all frames, shots of the debris on the floor, the ground in front, flight activity before beginning, a view into the hive before smoking and pulling frames and other seemingly meaningless details may prove useful later. Also, shots of piles of bees or frames covered with bees gives you a chance to look for riding varroa and deformed wings later at leisure without bee movement and distractions and under magnification.

As for shooting the frames to record brood and pollen, etc., plan exactly what you want to photograph, at what angle, what distance, where the light will be, and how to ensure that the contents of cells will not be shaded or out of focus.

Although many of us just hold a frame in one hand and the camera in the other and shoot, there are tricks to the job. A helper can be very handy since handing a beehive, a smoker, a hive tool, a brush, and a camera at the same time is awkward and can be hard on the camera.

A simple improvised stand to hold the frame in position while you shoot is a good idea, but remember that the sun moves fairy quickly across the sky and if your examination takes long, the sun may not shine directly into the cells after a while unless you rotate the stand a bit.

Full sun should always shine directly into the cells when you shoot so that the entire contents are illuminated or you won't see much when you look at the photos later. Don't leave open brood in this position for longer than necessary, though.  Ultra violet and solar heat kills larvae, given time.  Flash may work for you, but on some cameras the flash is offset a sufficient distance from the lens that a shadow in cells will result.  Experiment.

Honey and wax are sticky and are certain to gum up a camera or phone, almost regardless of what you do.  Some cameras and cases can be washed or wiped, but others can be damaged.  The cheap waterproof cameras like the Fujifilm FinePix XP Series Underwater Digital Cameras can be washed under a tap and take acceptable images.

Practice on an empty box of frames and look at your results before 'going live'.  You'll see what the potential errors are where you can improve and avoid molesting the hive only to find your pictures are almost useless due to errors in angle, lighting, focus, or other factors.

When you are done, upload the images and examine critically the pictures blown up on a computer screen.  You may learn you need to adjust focus or lighting better when you find that detail is blurred or obscured. 

If the entire frame surface and cell is not in focus, the camera was too close.  Also, if the camera was too close to the frame, maybe the camera could only see into the middle cells and not the cells farther from the centre of the view.  You will need to increase the camera distance and zoom, or crop the pictures later if you don't zoom. Same result (+/-).

Once you are satisfied you have the technique down pat on the dry run, it is time to inspect your hive. Pick a warm sunny day with a light honey flow so the bees are in a jolly mood, but have a lit smoker at hand.  This will take a while and rushing will just botch the job and make both you and the bees unhappy.

Start with any context shots, then take frames out one at a time, shake the bees off if necessary, and shoot each side in order, then replace them as you go. It is a good plan to have a series of numbered paper scraps prepared to label each frame in turn. (Frame 1, east side, frame 1 west side, frame 2 east side, frame 2 west side... ).  Otherwise the results can be confusing.

Although a few bees on a frame are no issue, too many will hide the cells and later you will want to see into them. You may have to shake bees off frames and herd them around with your breath, a finger, or a bee brush and/or a few careful puffs of smoke.

When you are done, upload the shots and edit them.  Keep all the originals in a folder and then save the edited versions separately in case you find you need to go back to the originals for some reason.

From the shots, if you did them right, you can measure brood area, amounts of open and sealed brood, brood pattern, amount of pollen and nectar near the brood, amount of sealed honey, and more. You can also detect disease -- and you can share the images, full size using Dropbox or other cloud services.

What can you see in a cell?  To be cont'd.

Before lunch, I walked in to the detailer and drove Mom's car home. They did a passable job, but not first class. After lunch, Mom and I went to Walmart. 

Days past, as with many people who have never shopped there, she was negative about Walmart and reluctant to go.  The first time I convinced her to try, though, she discovered that she is empowered there.  Although she is weak and walking -- even with a walker -- is difficult, at Walmart she can ride an electric shopping buggy, find items she needs ranging from automotive to houseware and groceries, grab things off the shelves, or ask people to lift things down if I'm not nearby. The lights bothered her at first, but now she wears shades.  Walmart makes for a good outing.

We loaded up on food and a few household items, bought two roasted chickens and drove home for supper.  I cooked some vegetables and that was the day.

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
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Saturday May 6th 2017

I slept poorly, then slept in until nine. The day is cool and windy.  Wind is gusty and from the northeast.  Rain is predicted.

I spent the morning writing and doing small things and then, after lunch, made a big pot of chicken soup with Mom.

After supper, I went to Walmart, then Bill & Fayes to visit.  Myra and Ken were there and staying for the weekend.  On their way back to the Soo from Toronto, the truck they were towing behind their motorhome had had a flat on a front wheel, destroying the tire, and the size is uncommon, so they were stuck in Sudbury until a replacement arrives on Monday.

I left around eleven and was in bed around midnight.

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
Archives - 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011| 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 |1999
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Sunday May 7th 2017

Three Hills Forecast: Today Mainly cloudy with 30 percent chance of showers. Wind north 20 km/h gusting to 40 becoming light this afternoon. High 14. UV index 5 or moderate. Tonight Clearing late this evening. Low plus 2.

Here in Sudbury, the day is sunny, but cool.  I see Alberta is cooler, too, but still on a warm trend.

Sid came over at 1000 and we visited until 1145.  He left and we had lunch.

After lunch, I napped and did some odds and ends.  I took out the blower and blew leaves off the boat.  the inside is a mess, with some mildew from not being wrapped.  I'll not do much this trip though since I'll have to do it all over when I come back if I do.

Late in the afternoon, I went to Walmart and returned items, then drove to Wickendens' for supper.  We visited until nine, then I returned to 1207.

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
Archives - 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011| 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 |1999
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Monday May 8th 2017

Three Hills Forecast: Today Mainly sunny. Wind northwest 20 km/h becoming south 20 this afternoon. High 19. UV index 6 or high. Tonight Increasing cloudiness early this evening. Wind south 20 km/h becoming light near midnight. Low plus 3.

Today is another fairly nice day.  Still cool, but sunny in the morning.  I woke up late and have been groggy all morning.  I'm putting on weight here, too.  Up three pounds!

I didn't go anywhere today.  I moved my boat around to get it level, then spent several hours trying to untangle the material I got from my Sail Canada Instructor clinic.   I have another month and a half to complete certification and need to get my ducks in a row. 

I chased down my Coastal Nave certification recently, and discovered it had not been recorded at SC, at least as far as I can find out so far.  I'll have to re-write it.  I also have to update first aid and CPR, but will put that off until I actually need it since it expires periodically.

The course material was confusing at the time and I figure I need to make sense of it, so I dug in.

No wonder I was confused.  The material in internally self-contradictory and refers to the same documents by a number of similar, but different titles.  Moreover the material is written in an indirect style typical of bureaucrat-speak.  It seems to say something and contains many of the right words, but leaves a person wondering exactly what was meant.

A friend on mine who taught philosophy explained me many years ago that it is possible to make up sentences, paragraphs, and even books that are grammatically and structurally unassailable but which make absolutely no sense.

An example he used was, "Is the mountain happy?"  I realise that sentence may make sense to some people, but , then, I wonder about their reasoning ability and their connection to objective reality as most of us know it.

I am considering re-writing the material in more sensible terms, but wonder if that would be considered presumptuous and on whose toes I would be stepping -- and if doing so would antagonize someone powerful in SC.

After all, the reason I live in Alberta is that I openly discussed a serious product flaw I alone discovered in a Toronto-based company product while the defective product was still in inventory and before the company could rectify the error at the plant and move the remaining stock onto unsuspecting customers. They would rather have papered the problem over.  That was the seventies.  The team was everything, cover-ups were de rigeur, and whistle-blowers were unloved.

As a result, I was 'promoted' from the self-proclaimed centre of Canadian culture and enterprise -- Leaside (Toronto) -- to a well-paid exile in the Canadian Siberia at the time (Calgary, Alberta). 

As it happened, I liked it there and never moved back to Central Canada.

I printed out several of the priority documents.  That was not a simple task as the printer said it was printing pages in order, but what it meant was it would print in reverse order and the that the end result would be the pages stacked in order on the out tray.

This would not matter except I was attempting to print two-sided and expected that it would do what it said, not what it meant.  I found my first try was a mess and had to discard it.  I hate to waste paper and ink.

I managed to get a good job on two docs then, still confused by the course material internal errors, and absorbing the printer assumptions, I began packing and went to bed at nine.  That was enough for one day, and besides I was out of paper.

My shuttle arrives at four-thirty. Last time I called a shuttle, I looked out to see it sitting in the drive a half-hour early and I was not completely ready having expected them to be on time not early. I hate to keep anyone waiting.

For years the previous shuttle was reliable and the dispatcher understandable.  A new shuttle moved in and the old one retired. The price is higher, the dispatcher is harder to understand, and the arrivals are less likely to be when expected.  Once, they lost my reservation and I almost missed my flight.

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
Archives - 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011| 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 |1999
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Tuesday May 9th 2017

I woke up at one and was not going back to sleep, so I got up, ate breakfast, did a wash and finished packing.  I have a few hours until my cab comes at 0430, and will doze or catch up on correspondence.

My shuttle came on time and around eleven I was driving out of the Park and Jet lot and on my way back home.

On the flight from Toronto, I watched several episodes of "Paranoid" I had downloaded in advance.  I'm enjoying this series.  The characters and plot are gentle and authentic, to my view, anyhow.

I stopped to shop in Airdrie, drove to the Mill and had lunch with Fen, Maddy and Bert, then met Ruth in Three Hills to pick up Zip.

On the way home, I stopped at Elliotts' and helped Shirley get her new computer working and set her up with a new Internet provider since her current plan is expensive and giving issues.

I went home and chilled out.

I correct, revise and augment entries in the previous several days first thing each day before writing new diary entries.
 Read yesterday's post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
Archives - 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011| 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 |1999
Honey Bee World Forum | HoneyBeeWorld List | Contact me 

 

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